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Volume I Episodes


Episode 2: Union Civil War Rations


Link goes to Amazon.com

Revised U.S. Army Regulations of 1861, printed in 1863.

This book is a wealth of information! The link here is a reliable copy, but if you need to use it for Living History, you might want to look for a better cover to take into the field.
Full of information about how the Army wanted things done, it is an excellent place to start. However, veterans will tell you not all went according to plane.


Episode 5: Hell Fire Stew


Link goes to Amazon.com

A Drummer-boy's Diary: Comprising Four years of service with the Second Regiment Minnesota Veteran Volunteers, 1861 to 1865 - William Bircher


Bircher was a drummer in the 2nd Minnesota. It is said "An army travels on it's stomach" and Bircher is no exception. He writes about food a lot in his diary and in Episode 5, we made up one of the recipes.


Episode 6: Richmond Depot Jacket Type II


Part I

Part II

These links will take you to great articles where Mr. Jensen creates the typology of jackets from the Richmond Depot. We cover them briefly in the episode but they are worthy of reading closely. Part II leads off with an excellent drawing which shows all three types of Richmond Depot jacket.


Episode 7: Coffee a la Zouave for a Mess of 10 Soldiers


Link goes to Amazon.com

The Military Handbook & Soldier's Manual.

This is a Beadle & Company (think the "dime" novels) reprint.


Link goes to Amazon.com

The Military Dictionary - H.L. Scott.

This publication also has the recipe listed, as well as many others by Soyer.


Episode 8: Union Soldiers' Christmas


Link goes to Amazon.com

Diary of a Young Army Officer by Josiah Favill

Favill's account of his time in the war has been reprinted as part of the Army of the Potomac series. Not only does he talk about Christmas but this is one of the best junior officer's accounts of the war I've read.


Link goes to Amazon.com

History of the Fortieth (Mozart) Regiment, New York Volunteers, Which Was Composed of Four Companies from New York, Four Companies from Massachusetts - By Fred Floyd.

This is a history of the regiment. The author mentions Christmas, along with the many other experiences they shared.


Link goes to Amazon.com

No More Gallant a Deed: A Civil War Memoir of the First Minnesota Volunteers - By James A. Wright

With heroic action at Gettysburg and other fields, this is an excellent read on the 1st Minnesota Infantry. Wright's glum mood is typical in the Army of the Potomac during Christmas 1862.


Link goes to Amazon.com

For Country Cause and Leader: The Civil War Journal of Charles B. Haydon - Edited by Stephen W. Sears

Excellent account of a man who started a sergeant and ended up a field officer.


Link goes to Amazon.com

Army Life in Virginia: The Civil War Letters of George G. Benedict - Edited by Eric Ward

A newspaper man himself, George Benedict wrote regular letters back to the paper during his time of service.


Link goes to Amazon.com

A "Guest" of the Confederacy The Civil War Letters and Diaries of Alonzo M. Keeler, Captain, Company B, Twenty-second Michigan Infantry - Edited by Robert and Cheryl Allen

Keeler's time in service included time in Libby Prison, where he had a Christmas meal men in the army would have craved.


Link goes to Amazon.com

Hell on Belle Isle: Diary of a Civil War Pow - by Jacob Osborn Coburn

This POW account is quite the contrast to Keeler's Christmas in Libby.


Link goes to Amazon.com

Divided Christmas: Four Years of Civil War Yuletides- By Patricia B. Mitchell

A compilation of stories, including General Sherman's famous telegraph.


Link goes to Amazon.com

On the Skirmish Line Behind a Friendly Tree: The Civil War Memoirs of William Royal Oake, 26th Iowa Volunteers - By William Royal Oake

A soldier's account from Iowa, including a Christmas story after Sherman's entered Savannah.



Link goes to Amazon.com

Dear Carrie: The Civil War Letters of Thomas N. Stevens - By George M. Blackburn

Stevens was in hospital in 1864 and left letters from both 1863 and 1864 for his "Dear Carrie" and their children.

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